Adding the DC1000 to your existing AT Tester Set Up

The DC1000 integrates with your existing AT testers installation, allowing you to rapidly and automatically test for unwanted core saturation.

This extends your on-board DC Bias current test capability from 0.4 Amps DC (AT36) or 1 Amp DC (AT56) to 25 Amps DC.
Additional DC1000s can be stacked to extend this even further to 50 Amps DC (2 units), 75 Amps DC (3 units)... up to a maximum of 20 units (500 Amps DC).

In all cases, The AT tester controls the DC1000 when required by your *.ATP test program by adding the tests LSBX, LPBX or ZBX into the program.
This maintains the simple “Run + Pass or Fail “ idea of the programming system, and all tests are controlled from one central test program.
During a DC bias test the AT automatically turns on the DC1000 to the required DC level, checks for stabilization of both the DC bias signal from the DC1000A, and the AC signal that the AT is applying, and then rapidly makes your desired measurement of Inductance or Impedance.
This guide gives you a quick overview of the comms connections for different use cases and examples of connection methods you can employ to get the best results quickly and every time you test.

1) DC+AT COMMUNICATION SET UP

1a) DC1000 and AT Editor using RS232
(AT5600 OR AT3600 OR ATI)

1 Connect AT AUX on the rear of the AT to the DC1000 RS232 IN using the
77-046 straight through 9w-9w M-F lead provided with the DC1000. (A)

2 Connect the PC running the AT Editor (you may be using a USB-RS232
converter here) to the DC1000 RS232 OUT port using 9w-9w F-F AT Editor
lead (B) (77-015). This is your existing AT Editor cable that came with the AT

DC+AT COMMUNICATION SET UP
DC+AT COMMUNICATION SET UP
1b) DC1000 and AT Server using RS232
(AT5600 OR AT3600 OR ATI)

1 Connect AT AUX on the rear of the AT to the DC1000 RS232 IN using the
77-046 straight through 9w-9w M-F lead provided with the DC1000. (A)

2 Connect the PC running the AT Server (you may be using an additional USB-RS232
converter here) to the AT SERVER PORT using 9w-25w F-F AT Server lead (B)
(77-016). This is your existing AT Server cable that came with the AT)

DC1000 and AT Server using RS232
DC1000 and AT Server using RS232
1c) DC1000 and AT Editor using USB
(AT5600 ONLY)

1 Connect AT AUX on the rear of the AT to the DC1000 RS232 IN using the
77-046 straight through 9w-9w M-F lead provided with the DC1000. (A)

2 Connect the PC running the AT Editor to the AT5600 USB-B port, using the
standard USB cable. This is your existing AT USB cable that came with the AT

DC1000 and AT Editor using USB
DC1000 and AT Editor using USB
1d) DC1000 and AT Server using ETHERNET
(AT5600 ONLY)


1 Connect AT AUX on the rear of the AT to the DC1000 RS232 IN using the
77-046 straight through 9w-9w M-F lead provided with the DC1000. (A)

2 Connect the PC running the AT Server to a valid DHCP hub on your network
using a standard Ethernet cable. (B)

3 Connect the AT5600 ETHERNET PORT to a valid DHCP hub on your network
using a standard Ethernet cable. (B)

DC1000 and AT Server using ETHERNET (AT5600 ONLY)
DC1000 and AT Server using ETHERNET (AT5600 ONLY)
1e) NOTES

1 In all cases it is possible to have both the AT Editor and AT Server simultaneously permanently connected and then used when needed.
They have been shown individually above for simplicity.
In the case of RS232 this would require 2 valid RS232 PC COM ports, one for AT Server and one for AT Editor.

2 Each DC1000 will also require its interlock port to be connected to allow the DC output to be enabled. (If not interlocked, you will see error code E009 on enable)
This can be done by either
A, Individually using the override plug provided (91-256) on each unit
B, When using multiple DC1000s, using one interlock plug and chaining the rest of the interlocks (see 104-174 Multiple Dc1000s)
B, Integrated with your existing AT interlock system (see DC1000A User Manual Chapter 5)

3 If using multiple DC1000s to generate more current, please see our Application Note 104-174 - Using Multiple DC1000s.
In this case the AT Tester sees the multiple DC1000s as one unit, and automatically controls the master DC1000, which in turn controls the slave DC1000 units.
The units do not have to be specially configured as Master or Slave units - they are still identical.
The connection of the COMMS as described in 104-174 will automatically set one unit as the master and any others as slave units.
For example, consider the case of 2 DC1000s being used to generate 40 Amps DC. The AT test program would simply request 40 Amps DC, and the master DC1000asdasdas

2) MAKING GOOD TEST CONNECTIONS

In all cases, the main consideration when integrating the DC1000 to your existing set up is to make sure that the entire path from the DC1000,
through the UUT and back to the DC1000 has wiring capable of carrying the DC Bias current level that you wish to apply.

This will prevent heating in the wires carrying the DC current, and stop any resulting voltage drop across the DC current path that will affect your AC
measurements.

2a DC1A Connections to Universal Fixture - Kelvin

In this simple case, a 2 pin inductor has the DC1000 output applied directly through it using the DC1000 leads and crocodile clips.
The existing AT Kelvin leads are still used on AT nodes 2 and 20 for the LSBX reading, (and any other tests you have programmed.)
As these will not be carrying the 25 Amp DC they can still be the standard 2 Amp rated clips+ wires.

2a DC1A Connections to Universal Fixture - Kelvin
2a DC1A Connections to Universal Fixture - Kelvin
2b DC1A connections to Universal Fixture -Non-Kelvin

A simpler configuration of the same part is shown here.
The DC1000 has been connected to the Universal fixture nodes (again 2+20) and short 25 Amp rated  cables and clips are then used to common the AT connection and the DC1000 connection to the UUT.

Again, the DC path is all 25 Amp rated.
It should be noted that in this example the 4 wire true kelvin connections are no longer being maintained up to the UUT, as shorting plugs have been used to connect source to measure at the fixture.
The small reduction in measurement accuracy may be an acceptable trade off for the resulting ease of connection.

2b DC1A connections to Universal Fixture -Non-Kelvin
2b DC1A connections to Universal Fixture -Non-Kelvin
2c DC1A Connection to an existing custom fixture

In the case shown, a SMPS transformer is tested using a push-fit 12 pin kelvin pin fixture.
The fixture has been modified to contain 2 x 4 mm 25 Amp connection sockets for the DC1000 to be connected to the fixture.
These 4 mm sockets are then connected inside the fixture to pins 2 + 4 of the transformer.

The fixture can still be used on parts with the same pin pitch, even without the DC1000 connected, as the DC1000 current path is independent of the normal 2 Amp source and measure.

2c DC1A Connection to an existing custom fixture
2c DC1A Connection to an existing custom fixture
2d Considerations for fixture wiring

Shown here is a diagrammatic view of the same fixture.

It shows one of the 4 mm sockets and the 25 Amp cable for the DC path.

The existing 2 Amp rated wiring for the AT source and AT measure nodes can be left as originally manufactured.

2d Considerations for fixture wiring
2d Considerations for fixture wiring
2e Using Multiple DC1A’s for > 25 Amps

Care should be taken when using multiple DC1000s to generate > 25 Amps.

Each DC1000 lead AND the plugs are designed for 25 Amps, so stacking the leads can potentially cause heating effects and voltage drops, because parts of the chain will be carrying more than the rated 25 Amps.(see picture)

In these cases, individual connections should be made to the UUT, or if you wish by means of a suitable bus bar which is rated for the current you wish to apply

2e Using Multiple DC1A’s for > 25 Amps
2e Using Multiple DC1A’s for > 25 Amps
2f Further Reading

Further advice can be found in the DC1000 user manual , chapter 6 This contains best practice advice to protect the DC1000 when using the DC1000 with the built in high voltage test on the AT5600/AT3600.

Please see
Chapter 6.3. Using IR, HPDC, HPAC, DCRT, ACRT, DCVB, ACVB Tests
Chapter 6.4. Using ILK, SURG, MAGI, STRW, WATT, VOC Tests